Home > John's Blogs, Theology > The Cultural Mandate and Politics

The Cultural Mandate and Politics

One of the frustrations I sense (though people don’t say it outright) is that our vote for the president will not impact the culture of our country, since ultimately our vote doesn’t count for much.  After all, the reasoning goes, it’s only one vote out of 100 million.  Andy Crouch has the antidote for that, as he considers the local nature of culture.

It’s an article very much worth reading for his entire view of the cultural mandate and our role in it as individuals.  There’s also too much worth quoting, so I going to limit myself to just one part of one paragraph:

We get paralyzed by thinking of culture as one monolithic, huge thing out there, when in fact the larger the scale the less anyone can claim to shape it. Much that’s of paramount importance in culture happens only on a local scale. While my neighborhood is affected by forces that stretch all the way up to global levels, there are many things about my neighborhood that can only be cultivated locally. No government agency can do it. No Hollywood movie can affect it. It’s up to me and my neighbors. And that’s a very significant portion of the culture that I’m responsible for. If I spend all my time preoccupied with grand, global scales of society I’m likely not to be responsible in the one place where I could probably make a difference. (ital. mine)

We can make a difference in our schools, right where we are.  We can make a difference in our neighborhood, right where we are. 

But, as they say, read the whole thing.

Advertisements
  1. B.L.Diller
    September 10, 2008 at 8:54 am

    I agree with what your saying on the local levl. Very true that we must make an impact in our own neighborhood in order to reach out to the global scales of society. However, and I know this was not your point, how significant is your vote if you are one of 50 million that don’t vote because you feel it don’t count for much. We may never know how important our vote truly is, but the right to vote is a right we should cherish.

  1. September 10, 2008 at 3:10 pm

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: